alexa Betaine for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: results of a randomized placebo-controlled trial.
Diabetes & Endocrinology

Diabetes & Endocrinology

Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism

Author(s): Abdelmalek MF, Sanderson SO, Angulo P, SoldevilaPico C, Liu C,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract Based on animal studies and pilot studies in humans, betaine, a methyl donor for the remethylation of homocysteine, may be a therapeutic agent for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of betaine for patients with NASH and whether betaine positively modified factors postulated to be "second hits" and underlying mechanisms of NASH. We conducted a randomized placebo-control study of 55 patients with biopsy-proven NASH who received either oral betaine (20 g daily) or placebo for 12 months. Pre- and posttreatment variables were analyzed using the paired t test or Wilcoxon rank test. Treatment groups were comparable at baseline. Of the 35 patients (17 betaine, 18 placebo) who completed the study, 34 patients (16 betaine, 18 placebo) underwent posttreatment liver biopsy. Patients randomized to betaine had a decrease in steatosis grade. No intra- or intergroup differences or changes in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease activity score or fibrosis stage were noted. Elevations of insulin, glucose, and proinflammatory cytokines and the reduced antioxidant status noted in NASH patients did not improve with betaine therapy. The antiinflammatory agent adiponectin was significantly reduced in both groups and did not change with therapy. Lastly, S-adenosylhomocysteine was approximately twice normal and was not reduced by betaine therapy. CONCLUSION: Compared to placebo, betaine did not improve hepatic steatosis but may protect against worseningsteatosis [corrected]. High-dose betaine supplementation failed to reduce S-adenosylhomocysteine and did not positively affect any of the second hit mechanisms postulated to contribute to NASH that we studied. Although betaine has been proven effective in treating hepatic steatosis in several animal models, translating novel therapeutic options noted in animal studies to humans with NASH will prove challenging. This article was published in Hepatology and referenced in Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords