alexa Bioinspired self-repairing slippery surfaces with pressure-stable omniphobicity.
Chemistry

Chemistry

Journal of Physical Chemistry & Biophysics

Author(s): Wong TS, Kang SH, Tang SK, Smythe EJ, Hatton BD, , Wong TS, Kang SH, Tang SK, Smythe EJ, Hatton BD, , Wong TS, Kang SH, Tang SK, Smythe EJ, Hatton BD, , Wong TS, Kang SH, Tang SK, Smythe EJ, Hatton BD,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract Creating a robust synthetic surface that repels various liquids would have broad technological implications for areas ranging from biomedical devices and fuel transport to architecture but has proved extremely challenging. Inspirations from natural nonwetting structures, particularly the leaves of the lotus, have led to the development of liquid-repellent microtextured surfaces that rely on the formation of a stable air-liquid interface. Despite over a decade of intense research, these surfaces are, however, still plagued with problems that restrict their practical applications: limited oleophobicity with high contact angle hysteresis, failure under pressure and upon physical damage, inability to self-heal and high production cost. To address these challenges, here we report a strategy to create self-healing, slippery liquid-infused porous surface(s) (SLIPS) with exceptional liquid- and ice-repellency, pressure stability and enhanced optical transparency. Our approach-inspired by Nepenthes pitcher plants-is conceptually different from the lotus effect, because we use nano/microstructured substrates to lock in place the infused lubricating fluid. We define the requirements for which the lubricant forms a stable, defect-free and inert 'slippery' interface. This surface outperforms its natural counterparts and state-of-the-art synthetic liquid-repellent surfaces in its capability to repel various simple and complex liquids (water, hydrocarbons, crude oil and blood), maintain low contact angle hysteresis (<2.5°), quickly restore liquid-repellency after physical damage (within 0.1-1 s), resist ice adhesion, and function at high pressures (up to about 680 atm). We show that these properties are insensitive to the precise geometry of the underlying substrate, making our approach applicable to various inexpensive, low-surface-energy structured materials (such as porous Teflon membrane). We envision that these slippery surfaces will be useful in fluid handling and transportation, optical sensing, medicine, and as self-cleaning and anti-fouling materials operating in extreme environments. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved This article was published in Nature and referenced in Journal of Physical Chemistry & Biophysics

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

  • 5th International Conference and Exhibition on Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
    Aug 14-16, 2017 Los Angeles, USA
  • 2nd International Conference on Physics
    Aug 28-30, 2017 Brussels, Belgium
  • 5th Global Chemistry Congress
    September 04-06, 2017 London, UK
  • 3rd World Chemistry Conference
    September 11-12, 2017 Dallas, USA
  • Global Conference on Physical Chemistry
    September 18-19, 2017 Dublin, Ireland
  • 2nd International Conference on Applied Chemistry  
    October 16-17, 2017 Toronto, Canada
Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords