alexa Characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium of animal origin obtained from the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System
Microbiology

Microbiology

Clinical Microbiology: Open Access

Author(s): S Zhao, PJ FedorkaCray, S Friedman, PF McDermott, RD Walker

Abstract Share this page

Salmonella Typhimurium remains one of the most common causes of salmonellosis in animals and humans in the United States. The emergence of multi-drug resistant Salmonella reduces the therapeutic options in cases of invasive infections, and has been shown to be associated with an increased burden of illness. In this study, 588 S. Typhimurium (including var. Copenhagen) isolates obtained from either animal diagnostic specimens (n = 199) or food animals after slaughter/processing (n = 389) were examined for antimicrobial susceptibility, presence of class-1 integrons, and characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and phage typing. Seventy-six percent (448/588) of isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial. Salmonella isolates displayed resistance most often to streptomycin (63%), tetracycline (61%), ampicillin (61%), and to a lesser extent, chloramphenicol (36%), ceftiofur (15%), gentamicin (9%), and nalidixic acid (4%), with more resistance observed among diagnostic isolates. Salmonella recovered from turkeys (n = 38) exhibited the highest rates of resistance, with 92% of isolates resistant to least one antimicrobial, and 58% resistant to > or =10 antimicrobials. Class 1 integrons were present in 51% of all isolates. Five integron associated resistance genes (aadA, aadB, pse-1, oxa-2 and dhfr) were identified. A total of 311 PFGE patterns were generated using XbaI, indicating a genetically diverse population. The largest PFGE cluster contained 146 isolates, including DT104 isolates obtained from all seven animal species. Results demonstrated a varied spectrum of antimicrobial resistance, including several multidrug resistant clonal groups, among S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium var. Copenhagen isolates recovered from both diagnostic and slaughter/processing samples.

This article was published in Foodborne Pathog Dis and referenced in Clinical Microbiology: Open Access

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords