alexa Cisplatin causes over-expression of tachykinin NK(1) receptors and increases ERK1 2- and PKA- phosphorylation during peak immediate- and delayed-phase emesis in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva) brainstem.
Medicine

Medicine

Family Medicine & Medical Science Research

Author(s): Darmani NA, Dey D, Chebolu S, Amos B, Kandpal R,

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Abstract Scant information is available regarding the effects of cisplatin on the expression profile of tachykinin NK(1) receptors and downstream signaling during cisplatin-induced emesis. Cisplatin causes peak early- and delayed-phase emesis in the least shrew at 1-2 and 33 h post-injection. To investigate the expression profile of NK(1) receptor during both emetic phases, we cloned the cDNA corresponding to a ~700 base pairs of mRNA flanked by two stretches of nucleotides conserved among different species and demonstrated that the shrew NK(1) receptor nucleotide sequence shares ~90\% sequence identity with the human NK(1) receptor. Of the 12 time-points tested, significant increases in expression levels of NK(1) receptor mRNA in the shrew brainstem occurred at 2 and 28 h post-cisplatin injection, whereas intestinal NK(1) receptor mRNA was increased at 28 h. Shrew brainstem and intestinal substance P mRNA levels also tended to increase during the two phases. Furthermore, expression levels of NK(1) receptor protein were significantly increased in the brainstem at 2, 8, and 33 h post-cisplatin. No change in brainstem 5-HT(3) receptor protein expression was observed. The temporal enhancements in NK(1) receptor protein expression were mirrored by significant increases in the phosphorylation status of the brainstem ERK1/2 at 2, 8, and 33 h post-cisplatin. Phosphorylation of PKA significantly increased at 33rd and 40th hour. Our results indicate associations between cisplatin's peak immediate- and delayed-phase vomiting frequency with increased: (1) expression levels of NK(1) receptor mRNA and its protein level, and (2) downstream NK(1) receptor-mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PKA signaling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. This article was published in Eur J Pharmacol and referenced in Family Medicine & Medical Science Research

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