alexa Consequences of the evolution of the GABA(A) receptor gene family.
Bioinformatics & Systems Biology

Bioinformatics & Systems Biology

Journal of Proteomics & Bioinformatics

Author(s): Darlison MG, Pahal I, Thode C

Abstract Share this page

Abstract 1. This paper reviews the evolution of the family of genes present in mammals and other vertebrates that encode gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A (GABA(A)) receptors, which are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system (CNS). In mammals, 16 different polypeptides (alpha1-alpha6, beta1-beta3, gamma1-gamma3, delta, epsilon, pi, and theta) have been identified, using recombinant DNA techniques, each of which is encoded by a distinct gene. The products of these genes assemble in diverse combinations to form a variety of receptor subtypes that have different sensitivities to a number of clinically relevant compounds, such as the benzodiazepines (BZs). 2. Based on a number of chromosomal mapping techniques, the majority of the GABA(A) receptor genes have been localized, in man, in four clusters on chromosomes 4, 5, 15, and the X. Furthermore, the genes that are present within these clusters have a conserved transcriptional orientation. It has, therefore, been proposed that the clusters arose largely as a consequence of two whole-genome doublings that occurred during chordate evolution, and that the ancestral cluster contained an "alpha-like," a "beta-like," and a "gamma-like" subunit gene. 3. Our laboratory has identified two additional GABA(A) receptor polypeptides (the beta4 and gamma4 subunits) in a number of vertebrate species; these do not appear to be present in mammals. We discuss here the relationship of the corresponding genes to other GABA(A) receptor genes, and conclude that their products are orthologous to the mammalian theta and epsilon subunits, respectively. 4. The GABA(A) receptor has a number of binding sites for compounds such as BZs, barbiturates, neurosteroids, and certain volatile anaesthetics. However, the only site at which endogenous compounds are thought to be active is the steroid site; this binds steroids such as certain metabolites of progesterone and deoxycorticosterone, which are synthesized in the periphery and CNS. Since the in vivo functional relevance, if any, of binding sites for other classes of compounds (such as the BZs) is unknown, the significance of differences in primary sequence, between different receptor subunits, is uncertain. We suggest that a possibly more important consequence of gene duplication is that it permitted greater flexibility in the level, pattern and regulation of expression of GABA(A) receptor genes. This article was published in Cell Mol Neurobiol and referenced in Journal of Proteomics & Bioinformatics

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

  • 9th International Conference on Bioinformatics
    October 23-24, 2017 Paris, France
  • 9th International Conference and Expo on Proteomics
    October 23-25, 2017 Paris, France

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri, Food, Aqua and Veterinary Science Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Clinical and Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Earth & Environmental Sciences

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science and Health care Journals

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics and Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Informatics Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Material Sciences Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Mathematics and Physics Journals

Jim Willison

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

John Behannon

phar[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords