alexa Contained rupture of the aneurysm of common iliac artery associated with pyogenic vertebral spondylitis.
Clinical Research

Clinical Research

Journal of Clinical Case Reports

Author(s): Doita M, Marui T, Kurosaka M, Yoshiya S, Tsuji Y,

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Abstract STUDY DESIGN: A case report. OBJECTIVES: To report and discuss a case of contained rupture of the aneurysm of common iliac artery associated with pyogenic vertebral spondylitis, so that investigators and practitioners may avoid the diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls associated with pyogenic vertebral spondylitis and aortic disease. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Pyogenic vertebral spondylitis is a rare disorder that may have serious consequences, including death, if it is not diagnosed promptly and treated effectively. The association of pyogenic vertebral spondylitis with infection of the aorta is a rare but potentially fatal condition that requires prompt diagnosis and aggressive surgical and medical therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a contained rupture of the aneurysm of common iliac artery case associated with pyogenic vertebral spondylitis resulting from an infection with Bacteroides fragilis,although Salmonellae infections are commonly associated with vertebral osteomyelitis and lesions of the contiguous aorta. METHODS: A 60-year-old man with chronic lower back pain began to experience a severe pain and had increased difficulty in walking. An MRI scan showed an increased signal in the L4-L5 disc space and an abscess extending into the spinal canal. The presumptive diagnosis was infective spondylitis. While performing a CT-guided needle biopsy, an unexpected contained rupture of the aneurysm of common iliac artery was discovered. RESULTS: A wide resection of all infected tissue, including the right common iliac artery and bony lesions, was performed in combination with antimicrobial therapy. A cryopreserved aortic allograft was used to reconstruct the artery, and an iliac strut graft was used to fill the debrided vertebral cavity. The patient's postoperative recovery was uneventful. CONCLUSION: The coexistence of pyogenic vertebral spondylitis and lesions of the aorta is rare, but may be lethal if not diagnosed promptly and treated effectively. Even if a patient's condition is stable and the hematocrit is normal, it is important to consider the possibility of a contained rupture of a mycotic abdominal aneurysm in all patients with vertebral osteomyelitis who have acute episodes of unusual severe back pain. CT is sometimes more beneficial than MRI in the identification and characterization of contained rupture of aneurysms.
This article was published in Spine (Phila Pa 1976) and referenced in Journal of Clinical Case Reports

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