alexa Cytokine signaling pathway polymorphisms and AIDS-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk in the multicenter AIDS cohort study.
Haematology

Haematology

Journal of Blood Disorders & Transfusion

Author(s): Wong HL, Breen EC, Pfeiffer RM, Aissani B, Martinson JJ,

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Abstract BACKGROUND: Cytokine stimulation of B-cell proliferation may be an important causative mechanism for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may be a co-factor, particularly for primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors, which are uniformly EBV-positive in the setting of AIDS. Thus, we examined associations of genetic variation in IL10 and related cytokine-signaling molecules (IL10RA, CXCL12, IL13, IL4, IL4R, CCL5 and BCL6) with AIDS-related NHL risk and evaluated differences between primary CNS and systemic tumors. PATIENTS AND MATERIALS: We compared 160 Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) participants with incident lymphomas, of which 90 followed another AIDS diagnosis, to HIV-1-seropositive controls matched on duration of lymphoma-free survival post-HIV-1 infection (N = 160) or post-AIDS diagnosis (N = 90). We fit conditional logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95\% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Carriage of at least one copy of the T allele for the IL10 rs1800871 (as compared to no copies) was associated with decreased AIDS-NHL risk specific to lymphomas arising from the CNS (CC vs. CT/TT: OR = 0.3; 95\% CI 0.1, 0.7) but not systemically (CC vs. CT/TT: OR = 1.0; 95\% CI 0.5, 1.9) (Pheterogeneity = 0.03). Carriage of two copies of the 'low IL10' haplotype rs1800896_A/rs1800871_T/rs1800872_A was associated with decreased lymphoma risk that varied by number of copies (Ptrend = 0.02). None of the ORs for the other studied polymorphisms was significantly different from 1.0. CONCLUSION: Excessive IL10 response to HIV-1 infection may be associated with increased risk of NHL, particularly in the CNS. IL10 dysregulation may be an important causative pathway for EBV-related lymphomagenesis.
This article was published in AIDS and referenced in Journal of Blood Disorders & Transfusion

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