alexa Do US ambient air lead levels have a significant impact on childhood blood lead levels: results of a national study.
Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

Author(s): Brink LL, Talbott EO, Sharma RK, Marsh GM, Wu WC,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract INTRODUCTION: Although lead paint and leaded gasoline have not been used in the US for thirty years, thousands of US children continue to have blood lead levels (BLLs) of concern. METHODS: We investigated the potential association of modeled air lead levels and BLLs ≥ 10 μ g/dL using a large CDC database with BLLs on children aged 0-3 years. Percent of children with BLLs ≥ 10 μ g/dL (2000-2007) by county and proportion of pre-50 housing and SES variables were merged with the US EPA's National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) modeled air lead data. RESULTS: The proportion with BLL ≥ 10 μ g/dL was 1.24\% in the highest air lead counties, and the proportion with BLL ≥ 10 μ g/dL was 0.36\% in the lowest air lead counties, resulting in a crude prevalence ratio of 3.4. Further analysis using multivariate negative binomial regression revealed that NATA lead was a significant predictor of \% BLL ≥ 10 μ g/dL after controlling for percent pre-l950 housing, percent rural, and percent black. A geospatial regression revealed that air lead, percent older housing, and poverty were all significant predictors of \% BLL ≥ 10 μ g/dL. CONCLUSIONS: More emphasis should be given to potential sources of ambient air lead near residential areas.
This article was published in J Environ Public Health and referenced in Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords