alexa Early behaviour and development in breast-fed premature infants are influenced by omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid status.
Reproductive Medicine

Reproductive Medicine

Journal of Pregnancy and Child Health

Author(s): LundqvistPersson C, Lau G, Nordin P, Strandvik B, Sabel KG

Abstract Share this page

Abstract BACKGROUND: The requirement of essential fatty acids (EFA) for the development of the brain is well documented. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the early neurological development at term and 44 weeks gestational age in preterm infants in relation to EFA concentrations in breast milk and in infants' and mothers' plasma phospholipids. METHOD: Fifty-one premature infants and their mothers were consecutively included in the study. The median gestational age was 34 weeks (range 24-36). The motor quality, motor and behavioural development were assessed by General Movements (GMs), the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (BNBAS) and a Self Regulation Scale. RESULTS: Mother's education and gestational age correlated to several outcome variables. Multiple regression with correction for background factors showed negative associations between early breast milk concentrations of Mead acid and GMs and between AA and the BNBAS clusters Orientation and Range of States, respectively. Between 40 and 44 weeks gestational age, no expected increased scores were observed for Regulation of States, Range of States and Self Regulation. During the corresponding time, increased concentration of linoleic acid in mothers' plasma was negatively associated with improvement in Orientation and increased concentration of EPA in the infants' plasma was positively associated with improvement in Autonomic Stability. CONCLUSIONS: The major omega-6 fatty acids and Mead acid were negatively associated with early development and omega-3 fatty acids positively associated. Mother's education and the gestational age influenced the outcome more strongly than mother's and infant's morbidities. Further follow-up will elucidate the significance of these early findings. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This article was published in Early Hum Dev and referenced in Journal of Pregnancy and Child Health

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords