alexa Early postoperative cognitive recovery after remifentanil-propofol or sufentanil-propofol anaesthesia for supratentorial craniotomy: a randomized trial.
Neurology

Neurology

Journal of Alzheimers Disease & Parkinsonism

Author(s): Bilotta F, Caramia R, Paoloni FP, Favaro R, Araimo F

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BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to evaluate early postoperative cognitive recovery after total intravenous anaesthesia with remifentanil-propofol or sufentanil-propofol in patients undergoing craniotomy for supratentorial expanding lesions. METHODS: Sixty patients were consecutively enrolled, and randomly assigned to one of two study groups: remifentanil-propofol or sufentanil-propofol anaesthesia. To evaluate cognitive function the Short Orientation Memory Concentration Test (SOMCT) and Rancho Los Amigos Scale (RLAS) were administered to all patients in a double-blind procedure before surgery at 15, 45 min and 3 h after extubation. RESULTS: Mean extubation time was similar in the two groups (13 +/- 5 min vs. 19 +/- 6 min). A significantly larger number of patients in the remifentanil-propofol group than in the sufentanil-propofol group required antihypertensive medication postoperatively to maintain mean arterial pressure within 20% of baseline (18/30 vs. 4/29; P = 0.0004). Intergroup analysis showed no differences in baseline SOMCT scores (28 +/- 1 vs. 28 +/- 1) whereas mean SOMCT scores at 15, 45 min and 3 h after extubation were significantly higher in the remifentanil-propofol group (30 patients) than in the sufentanil-propofol group (29 patients) (22 +/- 3 vs. 16 +/- 3; P < 0.0001 and 27 +/- 1 vs. 22 +/- 3; P < 0.0001; 28 +/- 1 vs. 26 +/- 2; P = 0.0126). CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, propofol-remifentanil and propofol-sufentanil are both suitable for fast-track neuroanaesthesia and provide similar intraoperative haemodynamics, awakening and extubation times. Despite a higher risk of treatable postoperative hypertension propofol-remifentanil allows earlier cognitive recovery.

This article was published in Eur J Anaesthesiol and referenced in Journal of Alzheimers Disease & Parkinsonism

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