alexa Effect of body size, ponderosity, and blood pressure on left ventricular growth in children and young adults in the Bogalusa Heart Study.
Diabetes & Endocrinology

Diabetes & Endocrinology

Journal of Obesity & Weight Loss Therapy

Author(s): Urbina EM, Gidding SS, Bao W, Pickoff AS, Berdusis K,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract BACKGROUND: The measurement of left ventricular mass (LVM) is important because individuals with increased LVM are at increased risk for cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure. There are limited longitudinal data on the acquisition of LVM in children and young adults and the relative importance of sex, growth, excess body weight, and blood pressure (BP) on change in LVM. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study cohort consisted of a cross section of 160 healthy children and young adults 9 to 22 years of age at first exam in the biracial community of Bogalusa, La. All had stable BP levels recorded over a 2- to 3-year period. Repeated examinations were performed 4 to 5 years apart. At each exam, 6 BPs were obtained with a mercury sphygmomanometer by trained examiners. The mean of the observations was used, with the fourth Korotkoff phase serving as the measure of diastolic BP. Anthropometric data, including height (HT), weight (WT), and triceps skin fold thickness (TSF), were also obtained, and M-mode echocardiograms were performed. Ponderal index (PI = WT/HT3) was used as a measure of weight-for-height. Tracking of HT (r = .68 to .76), WT (r = .73 to .82), PI (r = .77 to .89), TSF (r = .70 to .80), BP (r = .47 to .60), and LVM (r = .40 to .70) was strong in both sexes (P < .0001). LVM indexed for linear growth (LVM/HT2.7) tracked in females (r = .56, P < .0001) but not in males. In univariate cross-sectional analyses, LVM/HT2.7 correlated with WT, PI, and TSF in both sexes (r = .21 to .60, P < .05) and with systolic BP (SBP) in females (r = .23, P < .05). WT was the only independent correlate of LVM/HT2.7 in both sexes in multivariate cross-sectional analysis in a model containing age, SBP, WT, and TSF as independent variables (r2 = .08 to .28, P < .02). In longitudinal univariate analyses, initial measurements of WT, PI, and TSF predicted final LVM/HT2.7 in both sexes (r = .28 to .56, P < .01), and SBP was significant for females (r = .27, P < .05). In multivariate analyses, initial WT was associated with final LVM and LVM/HT2.7 in both sexes (r2 = .27 to .54, P < .01). Finally, baseline LVM correlated with final SBP in both sexes (r = .21 to .27, P < .05), and initial LVM/HT2.7 correlated with final SBP in females (r = .26, P < .05) with a trend for males (r = .17). CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that linear growth is the major determinant of cardiac growth in children and that excess weight may lead to the acquisition of LVM beyond that expected from normal growth. Increased mass may also precede the development of increased BP. The development of obesity may therefore be a significant, and possibly modifiable, risk factor for developing left ventricular hypertrophy and hypertension, risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
This article was published in Circulation and referenced in Journal of Obesity & Weight Loss Therapy

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

  • 14th Global Obesity Meeting
    Oct 23-24, 2017 Dubai, UAE
  • 16th International Conference and Exhibition on Obesity & Weight Management
    November 13-15, 2017 Atlanta,Georgia, USA

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri, Food, Aqua and Veterinary Science Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Clinical and Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Earth & Environmental Sciences

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science and Health care Journals

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics and Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Informatics Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Material Sciences Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Mathematics and Physics Journals

Jim Willison

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

John Behannon

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords