alexa Effect of high- and low-intensity exercise and metabolic acidosis on levels of GH, IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and cortisol.
Physicaltherapy & Rehabilitation

Physicaltherapy & Rehabilitation

Journal of Sports Medicine & Doping Studies

Author(s): Wahl P, Zinner C, Achtzehn S, Bloch W, Mester J

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Abstract OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute hormonal response of a short term high-intensity training (HIT) versus a high volume endurance training (HVT) and to determine the contribution of the metabolic acidosis as a stimulus for possibly different reactions of circulating hGH, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and cortisol. DESIGN: Eleven subjects participated in three experimental trials separated by one week. Two times subjects performed four 30s maximal effort exercise bouts on a cycle ergometer separated by 5 min rest each. Before the exercise subjects either received (single-blinded) bicarbonate (HIT (B)) or a placebo (HIT (P)). The third exercise trail consisted of a constant load exercise for 1h at 50\% VO₂max (HVT). Venous blood samples were taken under resting conditions, 10 min, 60 min and 240 min after each exercise condition to determine hGH, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and cortisol serum concentrations. Capillary blood samples were taken to determine lactate concentrations and blood gas parameters. RESULTS: Power output, mean lactate concentrations and mean pH values were significantly higher during HIT (B) compared to HIT (P). Serum cortisol and hGH concentrations were significantly increased 10 min post exercise in both HIT interventions. IGFBP-3 was only significantly increased after HIT (P), whereas IGF-1 was not affected by any of the interventions. HVT showed no significant effects on cortisol, hGH, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels. Additionally it was shown that the diminished acidosis during HIT (B) attenuates the cortisol and hGH response. CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that HIT/acidosis is a stimulus for exercise-induced cortisol/hGH secretion, but not for IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 under these experimental conditions. These findings might be relevant for arrangements of interval training, due to the fact that active or passive recovery during rest periods influence the acid base status and may therefore influence the hormonal response. Copyright © 2010 Growth Hormone Research Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This article was published in Growth Horm IGF Res and referenced in Journal of Sports Medicine & Doping Studies

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