alexa Effect of length and diameter of drug-eluting stents versus bare-metal stents on late outcomes.
Medicine

Medicine

Emergency Medicine: Open Access

Author(s): Applegate RJ, Sacrinty MT, Kutcher MA, Santos RM, Gandhi SK,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract BACKGROUND: The risk of restenosis and other adverse cardiac events with bare-metal stents (BMS) is increased with smaller stent diameters and longer stent lengths. Drug-eluting stents (DES) may reduce this effect in select patients; however, whether this benefit occurs in high-risk lesions and patients in routine practice is not clear. METHODS AND RESULTS: Clinical outcomes (target-vessel revascularization [TVR], stent thrombosis, nonfatal myocardial infarction [MI], and cardiac death) at 2 years stratified by stented length and diameter were compared in 949 consecutive patients who received BMS and 1236 consecutive and comparable patients who received DES for single lesions. The longest tertile of BMS (>23 mm) was associated with increased hazard of TVR, ST, and nonfatal MI or death compared with shorter tertiles of BMS, which was abolished by DES. DES compared with BMS was independently associated with a lower hazard of TVR (HR, 0.34 [0.20 to 0.58]) and nonfatal MI or death (HR, 0.60 [0.39 to 0.92]) in the longest length tertile (>23 mm). No clear association of stented tertile diameter and clinical outcomes for either stent type was observed. However, DES compared with BMS was independently associated with a lower hazard of TVR for all diameter tertiles, and a lower hazard of nonfatal MI or death (0.66 [0.44 to 0.99]) in the largest diameter tertile (>3.4 mm). CONCLUSIONS: Independent of adverse patient and lesion characteristics, DES demonstrated significantly lower hazard of TVR and nonfatal MI or death at 2 years compared with BMS within the longest stented lengths (>23 mm) and largest diameters (>3.4 mm). This article was published in Circ Cardiovasc Interv and referenced in Emergency Medicine: Open Access

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords