alexa Effects of a-lipoic acid supplementation on maternal diabetes-induced growth retardation and congenital anomalies in rat fetuses
Biomedical Sciences

Biomedical Sciences

Journal of Biomolecular Research & Therapeutics

Author(s): MHM Al Ghafli, R Padmanabhan, HH Kataya, B Berg

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The mechanism of diabetic embryopathy is not known. Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in diabetes may be causally related to foetal anomalies. The objective of this study was to determine whether supplementation with the antioxidant lipoic acid (LA) could prevent maternal diabetes-related foetal malformations and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) in rats. Pregnant rats were non-treated (Group I) or made diabetic on gestation day (GD) 2 by injecting streptozotocin (Group II). Group III was injected with 20 mg kg−1 of LA daily starting on GD 6 and continued through GD 19. Group IV was administered only Tris buffer on the corresponding days. Group V was a set of STZ-treated animals, which were supplemented with a daily dose of 20 mg kg−1 of LA from GD 6 through GD 19. All fetuses were collected on GD 20. Lipoic acid did not affect the blood sugar levels of diabetic animals significantly but improved their body weight gain and reduced food and water consumption. Diabetic group had a high incidence of embryonic resorption, IUGR, craniofacial malformations, supernumerary ribs and skeletal hypoplasia. Lipoic acid significantly reduced these abnormalities. These data support the hypothesis that ROS are causally related to fetal maldevelopment and IUGR associated with maternal diabetes in the rat. They also highlight the possible role of antioxidants in the normal processes of embryo survival, growth and development

This article was published in Mol Cell Biochem and referenced in Journal of Biomolecular Research & Therapeutics

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