alexa Genome-wide association identifies the T gene as a novel asthma pharmacogenetic locus.
Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

Author(s): Tantisira KG, Damask A, Szefler SJ, Schuemann B, Markezich A,

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Abstract RATIONALE: To date, most studies aimed at discovering genetic factors influencing treatment response in asthma have focused on biologic candidate genes. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) can rapidly identify novel pharmacogenetic loci. OBJECTIVES: To investigate if GWAS can identify novel pharmacogenetic loci in asthma. METHODS: Using phenotypic and GWAS genotype data available through the NHLBI-funded Single-nucleotide polymorphism Health association-Asthma Resource Project, we analyzed differences in FEV(1) in response to inhaled corticosteroids in 418 white subjects with asthma. Of the 444,088 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analyzed, the lowest 50 SNPs by P value were genotyped in an independent clinical trial population of 407 subjects with asthma. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The lowest P value for the GWAS analysis was 2.09 × 10(-6). Of the 47 SNPs successfully genotyped in the replication population, three were associated under the same genetic model in the same direction, including two of the top four SNPs ranked by P value. Combined P values for these SNPs were 1.06 × 10(-5) for rs3127412 and 6.13 × 10(-6) for rs6456042. Although these two were not located within a gene, they were tightly correlated with three variants mapping to potentially functional regions within the T gene. After genotyping, each T gene variant was also associated with lung function response to inhaled corticosteroids in each of the trials associated with rs3127412 and rs6456042 in the initial GWAS analysis. On average, there was a twofold to threefold difference in FEV(1) response for those subjects homozygous for the wild-type versus mutant alleles for each T gene SNP. CONCLUSIONS: Genome-wide association has identified the T gene as a novel pharmacogenetic locus for inhaled corticosteroid response in asthma.
This article was published in Am J Respir Crit Care Med and referenced in Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

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