alexa Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations in Mon and Burmese of southern Myanmar.

Author(s): Nuchprayoon I, Louicharoen C, Charoenvej W

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Abstract Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is highly prevalent in Southeast Asians. G6PD mutations are associated with specific ethnic groups in Southeast Asia. Mon is a minority ethnic group in Myanmar, which speaks Monic, a distinct language of Mon-Khmer classification. We studied G6PD mutations in Mon and Burmese males of southern Myanmar who migrated to Thailand in Samutsakhon province. G6PD deficiency was identified in 19 (12\%) of 162 Mon males and 17 (10\%) of 178 Burmese males, and then assayed for G6PD mutations. Among 19 G6PD-deficient Mons, 12 were G6PD Mahidol; one case each was G6PD Jammu (871G > A; nt 1311C), G6PD Kaiping (1388G > A), G6PD Mediterranean (563C > T), a novel mutation 94(C > G); and three remain unidentified. Among 17 G6PD-deficient Burmese, 12 were G6PD Mahidol; one each was G6PD Coimbra (592C > T), G6PD Kerala-Kalyan (949G > A), and G6PD Valladolid (406C > T); and two remain unidentified. G6PD Mahidol (487G > A) is the most common mutation among Mons and Burmese. All G6PD deficient Mon and Burmese, except for a person with G6PD Valladolid, shared the same haplotype nt93T, nt1311C. Despite a similar language root with Cambodian's Khmer language, our study suggests that Mon people share a common ancestry with Burmese rather than Cambodians. This article was published in J Hum Genet and referenced in

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