alexa Heterozygosity for a deletion in the CKR-5 gene leads to prolonged AIDS-free survival and slower CD4 T-cell decline in a cohort of HIV-seropositive individuals.
Infectious Diseases

Infectious Diseases

Journal of AIDS & Clinical Research

Author(s): EugenOlsen J, Iversen AK, Garred P, Koppelhus U, Pedersen C, , EugenOlsen J, Iversen AK, Garred P, Koppelhus U, Pedersen C,

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Abstract OBJECTIVE: Recently, it has been shown that a homozygous 32 base-pair deletion in the gene encoding CKR-5, a major coreceptor for HIV-1, leads to resistance to infection with HIV-1. We have investigated whether HIV-seropositive individuals who were heterozygous for the CKR-5 deletion had a different course of the disease. DESIGN: Thirty-five high-risk HIV-seronegative and 99 HIV-seropositive Danish homosexual men followed form 1985 to 1996 and 37 blood donors were analysed for their CKR-5 genotype by polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Two (6\%) of the 35 HIV-seropositive subjects at high-risk of infection were homozygous and seven (20\%) were heterozygous for the CKR-5 deletion. This was not significantly different from the distribution in normal donors. Twenty-two (22\%) of the 99 HIV-seropositive subjects were heterozygous and none was homozygous. Two subgroups of patients who had an opposite course of the HIV disease were identified. Of nine long-term non-progressors, six (66\%) were heterozygous for the deletion. This frequency is significantly higher than in nine rapid progressors of whom non was heterozygous. The frequency of heterozygotes in long-term non-progressors was also significantly higher than in the cohort as a whole. A Kaplan-Meier plot of the HIV-seropositive subjects, of whom 57 developed AIDS, showed a significantly better prognosis within the first 7 years of follow-up for those who were heterozygous for the deletion. Heterozygous individuals also had a significantly slower decrease in CD4 T-cell count per year. CONCLUSION: Individuals who are heterozygous for the 32-base-pair deletion in the CKR-5 gene have a slower decrease in their CD4 T-cell count and a longer AIDS-free survival than individuals with the wild-type gene for up to 11 years of follow-up.
This article was published in AIDS and referenced in Journal of AIDS & Clinical Research

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