alexa Identification of uncommon recurrent Potocki-Lupski syndrome-associated duplications and the distribution of rearrangement types and mechanisms in PTLS.
Cardiology

Cardiology

Journal of Clinical & Experimental Cardiology

Author(s): Zhang F, Potocki L, Sampson JB, Liu P, SanchezValle A,

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Abstract Nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) can mediate recurrent rearrangements in the human genome and cause genomic disorders. Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS) are genomic disorders associated with a 3.7 Mb deletion and its reciprocal duplication in 17p11.2, respectively. In addition to these common recurrent rearrangements, an uncommon recurrent 5 Mb SMS-associated deletion has been identified. However, its reciprocal duplication predicted by the NAHR mechanism had not been identified. Here we report the molecular assays on 74 subjects with PTLS-associated duplications, 35 of whom are newly investigated. By both oligonucleotide-based comparative genomic hybridization and recombination hot spot analyses, we identified two cases of the predicted 5 Mb uncommon recurrent PTLS-associated duplication. Interestingly, the crossovers occur in proximity to a recently delineated allelic homologous recombination (AHR) hot spot-associated sequence motif, further documenting the common hot spot features shared between NAHR and AHR. An additional eight subjects with nonrecurrent PTLS duplications were identified. The smallest region of overlap (SRO) for all of the 74 PTLS duplications examined is narrowed to a 125 kb interval containing only RAI1, a gene recently further implicated in autism. Sequence complexities consistent with DNA replication-based mechanisms were identified in four of eight (50\%) newly identified nonrecurrent PTLS duplications. Our findings of the uncommon recurrent PTLS-associated duplication at a relative prevalence reflecting the de novo mutation rate and the distribution of 17p11.2 duplication types in PTLS reveal insights into both the contributions of new mutations and the different underlying mechanisms that generate genomic rearrangements causing genomic disorders. Copyright 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
This article was published in Am J Hum Genet and referenced in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Cardiology

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