alexa In the shadow of Darwin: Anton de Bary's origin of myxomycetology and a molecular phylogeny of the plasmodial slime molds.
Orthopaedics

Orthopaedics

Journal of Osteoporosis and Physical Activity

Author(s): Hoppe T, Kutschera U

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Abstract In his Origin of Species (John Murray, London, 1859), Charles Darwin described the theory of descent with modification by means of natural selection and postulated that all life may have evolved from one or a few simple kinds of organisms. However, Darwin's concept of evolutionary change is entirely based on observations of populations of animals and plants. He briefly mentioned 'lower algae', but ignored amoebae, bacteria and other micro-organisms. In 1859, Anton de Bary, the founder of mycology and plant pathology, published a seminal paper on the biology and taxonomy of the plasmodial slime molds (myxomycetes). These heterotrophic protists are known primarily as a large composite mass, the plasmodium, in which single nuclei are suspended in a common 'naked' cytoplasm that is surrounded by a plasma membrane. Here we summarize the contents of de Bary's 1859 publication and highlight the significance of this scientific classic with respect to the establishment of the kingdom Protoctista (protists such as amoebae), the development of the protoplasmic theory of the cell, the introduction of the concept of symbiosis and the rejection of the dogma of spontaneous generation. We describe the life cycle of the myxomycetes, present new observations on the myxamoebae and propose a higher-order phylogeny based on elongation factor-1 alpha gene sequences. Our results document the congruence between the morphology-based taxonomy of the myxomycetes and molecular data. In addition, we show that free-living amoebae, common protists in the soil, are among the closest living relatives of the myxomycetes and conclude that de Bary's 'Amoeba-hypothesis' on the evolutionary origin of the plasmodial slime molds may have been correct. This article was published in Theory Biosci and referenced in Journal of Osteoporosis and Physical Activity

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