alexa Increased Framingham 10-year risk of coronary heart disease in middle-aged and older patients with psychotic symptoms.
Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Journal of Psychology & Psychotherapy

Author(s): Jin H, Folsom D, Sasaki A, Mudaliar S, Henry R,

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Abstract OBJECTIVE: The Framingham 10-risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been a widely studied estimate of cardiovascular risk in the general population. However, few studies have compared the relative risk of developing CHD in antipsychotic-treated patients with different psychiatric disorders, especially in older patients with psychotic symptoms. In this study, we compared the 10-year risk of developing CHD among middle-aged and older patients with psychotic symptoms to that in the general population. METHOD: We analyzed baseline data from a study examining metabolic and cardiovascular effects of atypical antipsychotics in patients over age 40 with psychotic symptoms. After excluding patients with prior history of CHD and stroke, 179 subjects were included in this study. Among them, 68 had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, 42 mood disorder, 38 dementia, and 31 PTSD. Clinical evaluations included medical and pharmacologic treatment history, physical examination, and clinical labs for metabolic profiles. Using the Framingham 10-year risk of developing CHD based on the Framingham Heart Study (FHS), we calculated the risk CHD risk for each patient, and then compared relative risk in each psychiatric diagnosis to the risks reported in the FHS. RESULTS: The mean age of entire sample was 63 (range 40-94) years, 68\% were men. The Framingham 10-year risk of CHD was increased by 79\% in schizophrenia, 72\% in PTSD, 61\% in mood disorder with psychosis, and 11\% in dementia relative to the risk in general population from the FHS. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of middle-aged and older patients with psychotic symptoms, we found a significantly increased 10-year risk of CHD relative to the estimated risk from FHS, with the greatest increased risk for patients with schizophrenia and PTSD. Development of optimally tailored prevention and intervention efforts to decrease different risk components in these patients could be an important step to help decrease the risks of CHD and overall mortality in this vulnerable population. Published by Elsevier B.V.
This article was published in Schizophr Res and referenced in Journal of Psychology & Psychotherapy

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