alexa Individual differences in two emotion regulation processes: implications for affect, relationships, and well-being.
Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Abnormal and Behavioural Psychology

Author(s): Gross JJ, John OP

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Abstract Five studies tested two general hypotheses: Individuals differ in their use of emotion regulation strategies such as reappraisal and suppression, and these individual differences have implications for affect, well-being, and social relationships. Study 1 presents new measures of the habitual use of reappraisal and suppression. Study 2 examines convergent and discriminant validity. Study 3 shows that reappraisers experience and express greater positive emotion and lesser negative emotion, whereas suppressors experience and express lesser positive emotion, yet experience greater negative emotion. Study 4 indicates that using reappraisal is associated with better interpersonal functioning, whereas using suppression is associated with worse interpersonal functioning. Study 5 shows that using reappraisal is related positively to well-being, whereas using suppression is related negatively.
This article was published in J Pers Soc Psychol and referenced in Abnormal and Behavioural Psychology

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