alexa Influence of gender on loss to follow-up in a large HIV treatment programme in western Kenya.
Infectious Diseases

Infectious Diseases

Journal of AIDS & Clinical Research

Author(s): OchiengOoko V, Ochieng D, Sidle JE, Holdsworth M, WoolsKaloustian K, , OchiengOoko V, Ochieng D, Sidle JE, Holdsworth M, WoolsKaloustian K,

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Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of loss to follow-up in a treatment programme for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Kenya and to investigate how loss to follow-up is affected by gender. METHODS: Between November 2001 and November 2007, 50 275 HIV-positive individuals aged ≥ 14 years (69\% female; median age: 36.2 years) were enrolled in the study. An individual was lost to follow-up when absent from the HIV treatment clinic for > 3 months if on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) or for > 6 months if not. The incidence of loss to follow-up was calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods and factors associated with loss to follow-up were identified by logistic and Cox multivariate regression analysis. FINDINGS: Overall, 8\% of individuals attended no follow-up visits, and 54\% of them were lost to follow-up. The overall incidence of loss to follow-up was 25.1 per 100 person-years. Among the 92\% who attended at least one follow-up visit, the incidence of loss to follow-up before and after starting cART was 27.2 and 14.0 per 100 person-years, respectively. Baseline factors associated with loss to follow-up included younger age, a long travel time to the clinic, patient disclosure of positive HIV status, high CD4+ lymphocyte count, advanced-stage HIV disease, and rural clinic location. Men were at an increased risk overall and before and after starting cART. CONCLUSION: The risk of being lost to follow-up was high, particularly before starting cART. Men were more likely to become lost to follow-up, even after adjusting for baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Interventions designed for men and women separately could improve retention.
This article was published in Bull World Health Organ and referenced in Journal of AIDS & Clinical Research

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