alexa Insights into the quantitative relationship between sensitization and challenge for allergic contact dermatitis reactions.
Immunology

Immunology

Immunome Research

Author(s): Scott AE, Kashon ML, Yucesoy B, Luster MI, Tinkle SS, Scott AE, Kashon ML, Yucesoy B, Luster MI, Tinkle SS

Abstract Share this page

Abstract The ability of chemical or pharmaceutical agents to induce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is of major health and regulatory concern. As such, tests to identify their sensitizing capacity, such as the guinea pig maximization test and the more recently developed local lymph node assay, are broadly used. Ideally, for risk assessment it is useful to translate results from animal data into establishing safe or no-effect levels for occupational or environmental agents. This, of course, would require consideration of the quantitative relationships between sensitizing and challenge doses as well as other exposure conditions. In the present studies, we modeled two sensitizers, 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene and squaric acid dibutyl ester, over a large range of concentrations using the LLNA and more traditional tests that measure both sensitization and elicitation responses. Both the sensitization and challenge phases provided similar dose-response curves, demonstrating a threshold followed by a shallow linear increase and eventual plateau at increasing doses. Extending earlier studies by P. S. Friedmann (1994, Immunotoxicology and Immunopharmacology, pp. 589-616, Raven Press, New York) in humans, we observed that the minimum dose required to elicit sensitization or challenge was not static, but rather reflected a "sliding-scale." That is, as the sensitization dose was increased, the concentration required to elicit a challenge response was decreased. Correspondingly, as the challenge dose was increased, the dose required for sensitization was lessened. Taken together, these findings indicate that there is a need to consider dose-response relationships for sensitization and challenge in establishing minimum exposure levels for chemicals that cause ACD.
This article was published in Toxicol Appl Pharmacol and referenced in Immunome Research

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

social_po[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords