alexa Khat chewing practice and its perceived health effects among communities of Dera Woreda, Amhara region, Ethiopia
Infectious Diseases

Infectious Diseases

Epidemiology: Open Access

Author(s): Asmamaw Zeleke, Worku Awoke, Endalew Gebeyehu, Fentie Ambaw

Abstract Share this page

Introduction: Khat chewing is believed to be rapidly increasing worldwide. Worldwid e, it is estimated that 10 million people consume khat daily. Khat chewing practice renders certain influence on physical and psy- chological well being of the community and it can cause more serious adverse psychiatric, cardiovascu- lar, dental and gastrointestinal effects. The recent sharp increase in khat consumptio n may not only affect the health of individuals but could also have serious so- cio-economic consequences. This study was conducted to assess prevalence of khat chewing practice, its asso- ciated factors and perceived health effects among com- munities in Dera woreda, Amhara region, Ethiopia 2013. Methods: Community-bas ed cross-sectional stu- dy was conducted by using both quantitative and qua- litative method of data. The sample size for quantita- tive was determined by using single population pro- portion formula and the households were selected by systematic sampling method and in the selected house- hold, one respondent was selected by lottery among members of household aged 15 years and above. Data were collected by means of a pretested questionnaire; analysis was carried out using SPSS version 16. For the qualitative part ten in-depth interviews were con- ducted on purposely selected individuals and sample size for this method was determined through continu- ing to interview participan ts until no new information was obtained. Results: The response rate was 98.3%. Current prevalence of khat chewing practice was 17%. Males were more likely to chew khat (AOR, 18.53; 95%CI, 7.20 - 47.66) compared to females. Muslims were more likely to chew khat (AOR, 4.34; 95%CI, 2.07 - 9.11) compared to Orthodox Christians. Re- spondents who had family member chewing khat were more likely to chew khat (AOR, 2.67; 95%CI, 1.15 - 6.21) compared to family member without a chewer. Among all the respondents, 92.8% perceived the health effects of khat chewing practice. Respondents who did not perceive health effect of khat were 5 times more likely to chew khat (AOR = 5.10, 95%CI; 1.64 - 15.5) compared to those who percei ved health effect of khat. Conclusions: The prevalence of khat chewing practice was 17% with high proportion of the khat chewers found in the urban setting. Sex, religion, residence, fa- mily chewing habit and perceived health effect were significantly associated factors with khat chewing practice. In this study 92.8% of the respondents per- ceived that khat chewing practice had harmful effects on health and the perceive d health effects reported were sleeping disorder, hallu cination, tooth staining, anxiety, and loss of appeti te, depression, constipation, gastritis, hypertension and psychosis.

This article was published in Open Journal of Epidemiology and referenced in Epidemiology: Open Access

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri, Food, Aqua and Veterinary Science Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Clinical and Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Earth & Environmental Sciences

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science and Health care Journals

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics and Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Informatics Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Material Sciences Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Mathematics and Physics Journals

Jim Willison

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

John Behannon

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords