alexa Long-term survival of fetal porcine lateral ganglionic eminence cells in the hippocampus of rats.
Surgery

Surgery

Journal of Transplantation Technologies & Research

Author(s): Jacoby DB, Lindberg C, Cunningham MG, Ratliff J, Dinsmore J

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Abstract Embryonic porcine brain tissue from the lateral ganglionic eminence was transplanted into the adult rat hippocampus to determine whether fetal striatal cells could survive, differentiate, and integrate in a heterotopic site. The hippocampus, a common site of epileptic seizure activity, was chosen to determine if fetal striatal cells could supply inhibitory GABAergic neurons that may serve to block seizures. Cells were either implanted with a single deposit using a standard metal cannula or by five smaller disseminated deposits with a glass micropipette. At 20-24 weeks, animals immunosuppressed with cyclosporin showed long-term survival of porcine cells in the adult hippocampus. Analysis by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization showed that the grafts contained glial and neuronal cell types, including GABAergic neurons within graft core and networks of porcine neuronal fibers extending from the graft into the host parenchyma. In addition, a marker of porcine presynaptic terminals, synaptobrevin, was abundant within the grafts and was found associated with hippocampal structures and cell layers suggesting functional integration of grafted cells within the host. The survival of xenografts in the hippocampus and potential integration of inhibitory components provides evidence that these grafts may serve as an internal negative feedback mechanism to quench epileptiform activity. This article was published in J Neurosci Res and referenced in Journal of Transplantation Technologies & Research

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