alexa Low subcutaneous thigh fat is a risk factor for unfavourable glucose and lipid levels, independently of high abdominal fat. The Health ABC Study.
Biochemistry

Biochemistry

Bioenergetics: Open Access

Author(s): Snijder MB, Visser M, Dekker JM, Goodpaster BH, Harris TB,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract AIMS: We investigated whether low subcutaneous thigh fat is an independent risk factor for unfavourable glucose and lipid levels, and whether these associations differ between sexes, and between white and black adults. Our secondary aim was to investigate which body composition characteristics (lean tissue, fat tissue) are reflected by anthropometric measures (waist and thigh circumference). METHODS: Anthropometric measurements and computed tomography of the abdomen and of the thigh were performed for all participants of the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study, who were aged 70-79 years. Fasting glucose, triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol, and 2-h postload glucose were determined. RESULTS: After excluding those already diagnosed with diabetes or dyslipidaemia, we analysed data from 2,106 participants. After adjustment for abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat, and intermuscular thigh fat, larger thigh subcutaneous fat area was statistically significantly associated with lower ln-transformed triglycerides [standardised beta (95\% CI) -0.12 (-0.20 to -0.04) in men and -0.13 (-0.21 to -0.05) in women] and higher ln-HDL-cholesterol [0.10 (0.02 to 0.19) and 0.09 (0.01 to 0.18), respectively]. The associations with lower glucose levels were strong in men [-0.11 (-0.20 to -0.02) for fasting and -0.14 (-0.23 to -0.05) for postload glucose], but not statistically significant in women [-0.02 (-0.10 to 0.07) and -0.04 (-0.13 to 0.05), respectively]. There were no differences in the associations between white and black persons. Waist circumference was more strongly associated with abdominal subcutaneous fat, and this association became stronger with increasing BMI, whereas the association with visceral fat became weaker. Thigh circumference was equally dependent on thigh fat and thigh muscle in men, whereas in women the fat component was the main contributor. CONCLUSION: Larger subcutaneous thigh fat is independently associated with more favourable glucose (in men) and lipid levels (in both sexes) after accounting for abdominal fat depots, which are associated with unfavourable glucose and lipid levels. Anthropometric measures reflect different fat depots at different levels of BMI at the abdomen, and reflect both fat and lean tissue at the thigh. These results emphasise the importance of accurate measures of regional body composition when investigating potential health risks. This article was published in Diabetologia and referenced in Bioenergetics: Open Access

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri, Food, Aqua and Veterinary Science Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Clinical and Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Earth & Environmental Sciences

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science and Health care Journals

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics and Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Informatics Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Material Sciences Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Mathematics and Physics Journals

Jim Willison

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

John Behannon

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords