alexa Lysosomal fusion dysfunction as a unifying hypothesis for Alzheimer's disease pathology.
Neurology

Neurology

Journal of Alzheimers Disease & Parkinsonism

Author(s): Funk KE, Kuret J, Funk KE, Kuret J

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Abstract Alzheimer's disease is characterized pathologically by extracellular senile plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and granulovacuolar degeneration. It has been debated whether these hallmark lesions are markers or mediators of disease progression, and numerous paradigms have been proposed to explain the appearance of each lesion individually. However, the unfaltering predictability of these lesions suggests a single pathological nidus central to disease onset and progression. One of the earliest pathologies observed in Alzheimer's disease is endocytic dysfunction. Here we review the recent literature of endocytic dysfunction with particular focus on disrupted lysosomal fusion and propose it as a unifying hypothesis for the three most-studied lesions of Alzheimer's disease.
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This article was published in Int J Alzheimers Dis and referenced in Journal of Alzheimers Disease & Parkinsonism

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