alexa Meaningful interpretation of subdiffusive measurements in living cells (crowded environment) by fluorescence fluctuation microscopy.
Biochemistry

Biochemistry

Biochemistry & Analytical Biochemistry

Author(s): Baumann G, Place RF, FldesPapp Z

Abstract Share this page

Abstract In living cell or its nucleus, the motions of molecules are complicated due to the large crowding and expected heterogeneity of the intracellular environment. Randomness in cellular systems can be either spatial (anomalous) or temporal (heterogeneous). In order to separate both processes, we introduce anomalous random walks on fractals that represented crowded environments. We report the use of numerical simulation and experimental data of single-molecule detection by fluorescence fluctuation microscopy for detecting resolution limits of different mobile fractions in crowded environment of living cells. We simulate the time scale behavior of diffusion times tau(D)(tau) for one component, e.g. the fast mobile fraction, and a second component, e.g. the slow mobile fraction. The less the anomalous exponent alpha the higher the geometric crowding of the underlying structure of motion that is quantified by the ratio of the Hausdorff dimension and the walk exponent d(f)/d(w) and specific for the type of crowding generator used. The simulated diffusion time decreases for smaller values of alpha # 1 but increases for a larger time scale tau at a given value of alpha # 1. The effect of translational anomalous motion is substantially greater if alpha differs much from 1. An alpha value close to 1 contributes little to the time dependence of subdiffusive motions. Thus, quantitative determination of molecular weights from measured diffusion times and apparent diffusion coefficients, respectively, in temporal auto- and crosscorrelation analyses and from time-dependent fluorescence imaging data are difficult to interpret and biased in crowded environments of living cells and their cellular compartments; anomalous dynamics on different time scales tau must be coupled with the quantitative analysis of how experimental parameters change with predictions from simulated subdiffusive dynamics of molecular motions and mechanistic models. We first demonstrate that the crowding exponent alpha also determines the resolution of differences in diffusion times between two components in addition to photophysical parameters well-known for normal motion in dilute solution. The resolution limit between two different kinds of single molecule species is also analyzed under translational anomalous motion with broken ergodicity. We apply our theoretical predictions of diffusion times and lower limits for the time resolution of two components to fluorescence images in human prostate cancer cells transfected with GFP-Ago2 and GFP-Ago1. In order to mimic heterogeneous behavior in crowded environments of living cells, we need to introduce so-called continuous time random walks (CTRW). CTRWs were originally performed on regular lattice. This purely stochastic molecule behavior leads to subdiffusive motion with broken ergodicity in our simulations. For the first time, we are able to quantitatively differentiate between anomalous motion without broken ergodicity and anomalous motion with broken ergodicity in time-dependent fluorescence microscopy data sets of living cells. Since the experimental conditions to measure a selfsame molecule over an extended period of time, at which biology is taken place, in living cells or even in dilute solution are very restrictive, we need to perform the time average over a subpopulation of different single molecules of the same kind. For time averages over subpopulations of single molecules, the temporal auto- and crosscorrelation functions are first found. Knowing the crowding parameter alpha for the cell type and cellular compartment type, respectively, the heterogeneous parameter gamma can be obtained from the measurements in the presence of the interacting reaction partner, e.g. ligand, with the same alpha value. The product alpha x gamma = gamma is not a simple fitting parameter in the temporal auto- and two-color crosscorrelation functions because it is related to the proper physical models of anomalous (spatial) and heterogeneous (temporal) randomness in cellular systems.We have already derived an analytical solution gamma for in the special case of gamma = 3/2. In the case of two-color crosscorrelation or/and two-color fluorescence imaging (co-localization experiments), the second component is also a two-color species gr, for example a different molecular complex with an additional ligand. Here, we first show that plausible biological mechanisms from FCS/ FCCS and fluorescence imaging in living cells are highly questionable without proper quantitative physical models of subdiffusive motion and temporal randomness. At best, such quantitative FCS/ FCCS and fluorescence imaging data are difficult to interpret under crowding and heterogeneous conditions. It is challenging to translate proper physical models of anomalous (spatial) and heterogeneous (temporal) randomness in living cells and their cellular compartments like the nucleus into biological models of the cell biological process under study testable by single-molecule approaches. Otherwise, quantitative FCS/FCCS and fluorescence imaging measurements in living cells are not well described and cannot be interpreted in a meaningful way.
This article was published in Curr Pharm Biotechnol and referenced in Biochemistry & Analytical Biochemistry

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

  • 2nd International Conference on Biochemistry
    Sep 21-22, 2017 Macau, Hong Kong

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri, Food, Aqua and Veterinary Science Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Clinical and Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Earth & Environmental Sciences

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science and Health care Journals

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics and Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Informatics Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Material Sciences Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Mathematics and Physics Journals

Jim Willison

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

John Behannon

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords