alexa Methane and carbon dioxide emissions and nitrogen turnover during liquid manure storage
Engineering

Engineering

Journal of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Author(s): Sven G Sommer, Sren O Petersen, Peter Srensen, Hanne D Poulsen, Henrik B Mller

Abstract Share this page

Animal slurry stored in-house and outside is a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). The CH4 source strength of stored slurry is greatly affected by temperature. To improve emission calculations on a global scale there is a need for knowledge about the relationship between production of CH4 in slurry and temperature. In this study, the filling of slurry channels was reproduced in the laboratory by gradually filling 1 m-high PVC vessels during 9 days followed by incubation for 100–200 days. A preliminary test showed that little CH4 was produced from animal slurry during 10 days of incubation at 20°C, if no inoculum (slurry incubated anaerobically at the test temperature for 1.5–2 months) was present. However, the addition of 7.6% inoculum supported an immediate production of CH4. Vessels amended with inoculum and gradually filled with cattle or pig slurry were then incubated at 10, 15 and 20°C. Methane production from stored pig and cattle slurry was not significant at temperatures below 15°C, where CO2 was the main product of decomposition processes. In contrast, the anaerobic production of CH4 was high and significant relative to the production of CO2 at 20°C. Peak emissions of CH4 averaging 0.012 and 0.02 g C h−1 kg−1 volatile solids (VS) were reached within about 10 days at 10 and 15°C, respectively. At 20°C, the emission of CH4 from pig slurry was about 0.01 g C h−1 kg−1 for 10 days, and thereafter emissions increased to about 0.10 g C h−1 kg−1 VS. For cattle slurry a peak emission of 0.08 g C h−1 kg−1 VS was measured after 180 days. Degradation of organic nitrogen (N) in cattle slurry was related to the reduction of organic material as reflected in CO2 and CH4 emission. The mineralization of organic N during storage represented 10–80% of organic N in cattle slurry, and 40–80% of the organic N in pig slurry.

This article was published in Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems and referenced in Journal of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords