alexa Microflora of the gastrointestinal tract: a review.
Gastroenterology

Gastroenterology

Journal of Gastrointestinal & Digestive System

Author(s): Hao WL, Lee YK

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Abstract The mucosal surface of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is about 200-300 m2 and is colonized by 1013-14 bacteria of 400 different species and subspecies. Savage has defined and categorized the gastrointestinal microflora into two types, autochthonous flora (indigenous flora) and allochthonous flora (transient flora). Autochthonous microorganisms colonize particular habitats, i.e., physical spaces in the GI tract, whereas allochthonous microorganisms cannot colonize particular habitats except under abnormal conditions. Most pathogens are allochthonous microorganisms; nevertheless, some pathogens can be autochthonous to the ecosystem and normally live in harmony with the host, except when the system is disturbed. The prevalence of bacteria in different parts of the GI tract appears to be dependent on several factors, such as pH, peristalsis, redox potential, bacterial adhesion, bacterial cooperation, mucin secretion, nutrient availability, diet, and bacterial antagonism. Because of the low pH of the stomach and the relatively swift peristalsis through the stomach and the small bowel, the stomach and the upper two-thirds of the small intestine (duodenum and jejunum) contain only low numbers of microorganisms, which range from 103 to 104 bacteria/mL of the gastric or intestinal contents, mainly acid-tolerant lactobacilli and streptococci. In the distal small intestine (ileum), the microflora begin to resemble those of the colon, with around 107-108 bacteria/mL of the intestinal contents. With decreased peristalsis, acidity, and lower oxidation-reduction potentials, the ileum maintains a more diverse microflora and a higher bacterial population. Probably because of slow intestinal motility and very low oxidation-reduction potentials, the colon is the primary site of microbial colonization in humans. The colon harbors tremendous numbers and species of bacteria. However, 99.9\% of colonic microflora are obligate anaerobes. This article was published in Methods Mol Biol and referenced in Journal of Gastrointestinal & Digestive System

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