alexa Mountaineering Fatalities on Denali
Cardiology

Cardiology

Journal of Clinical & Experimental Cardiology

Author(s): Scott E McIntosh

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McIntosh, Scott E., Aaron D. Campbell, Jennifer Dow, and Colin K. Grissom. Mountaineering fatalities on Denali. High Alt. Med. Biol. 9:89–95, 2008.—Mount McKinley, or Denali, is the tallest mountain in North America and attracts over 1000 climbers annually from around the world. Since Denali is located within a national park, the National Park Service (NPS) manages mountaineering activities and attempts to maintain a balance of an adventurous experience while promoting safety. We retrospectively reviewed the fatalities on Denali from 1903 to 2006 to assist the NPS, medical personnel, and mountaineers improve safety and reduce fatalities on the mountain. Historical records and the NPS climber database were reviewed. Demographics, mechanisms, and circumstances surrounding each fatality were examined. Fatality rates and odds ratios for country of origin were calculated. From 1903 through the end of the 2006 climbing season, 96 individuals died on Denali. The fatality rate is declining and is 3.08/1000 summit attempts. Of the 96 deaths, 92% were male, 51% occurred on the West Buttress route, and 45% were due to injuries sustained from falls. Sixty-one percent occurred on the descent and the largest number of deaths in 1 year occurred in 1992. Climbers from Asia had the highest odds of dying on the mountain. Fatalities were decreased by 53% after a NPS registration system was established in 1995. Although mountaineering remains a high-risk activity, safety on Denali is improving. Certain groups have a significantly higher chance of dying. Registration systems and screening methods provide ways to target at-risk groups and improve safety on high altitude mountains such as Denali.

This article was published in High Alt Med Biol and referenced in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Cardiology

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