alexa Multidisciplinary prospective study of mother-to-child chikungunya virus infections on the island of La Réunion.
Clinical Research

Clinical Research

Journal of Clinical Case Reports

Author(s): Grardin P, Barau G, Michault A, Bintner M, Randrianaivo H,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract BACKGROUND: An outbreak of chikungunya virus affected over one-third of the population of La Réunion Island between March 2005 and December 2006. In June 2005, we identified the first case of mother-to-child chikungunya virus transmission at the Groupe Hospitalier Sud-Réunion level-3 maternity department. The goal of this prospective study was to characterize the epidemiological, clinical, biological, and radiological features and outcomes of all the cases of vertically transmitted chikungunya infections recorded at our institution during this outbreak. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Over 22 mo, 7,504 women delivered 7,629 viable neonates; 678 (9.0\%) of these parturient women were infected (positive RT-PCR or IgM serology) during antepartum, and 61 (0.8\%) in pre- or intrapartum. With the exception of three early fetal deaths, vertical transmission was exclusively observed in near-term deliveries (median duration of gestation: 38 wk, range 35-40 wk) in the context of intrapartum viremia (19 cases of vertical transmission out of 39 women with intrapartum viremia, prevalence rate 0.25\%, vertical transmission rate 48.7\%). Cesarean section had no protective effect on transmission. All infected neonates were asymptomatic at birth, and median onset of neonatal disease was 4 d (range 3-7 d). Pain, prostration, and fever were present in 100\% of cases and thrombocytopenia in 89\%. Severe illness was observed in ten cases (52.6\%) and mainly consisted of encephalopathy (n = 9; 90\%). These nine children had pathologic MRI findings (brain swelling, n = 9; cerebral hemorrhages, n = 2), and four evolved towards persistent disabilities. CONCLUSIONS: Mother-to-child chikungunya virus transmission is frequent in the context of intrapartum maternal viremia, and often leads to severe neonatal infection. Chikungunya represents a substantial risk for neonates born to viremic parturients that should be taken into account by clinicians and public health authorities in the event of a chikungunya outbreak.
This article was published in PLoS Med and referenced in Journal of Clinical Case Reports

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

  • Global Experts meeting on Oncology Case Reports
    Aug 29-31, 2017 London, UK
  • Global Experts Meeting on Case Reports
    Osaka, Japan October 09-11, 2017
  • 6th Global Experts Meeting on Medical Case Reports
    October 16-18, 2017 San Francisco, California, USA

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords