alexa Natural microbe-mediated refractoriness to Plasmodium infection in Anopheles gambiae.
Biochemistry

Biochemistry

Biochemistry & Physiology: Open Access

Author(s): Cirimotich CM, Dong Y, Clayton AM, Sandiford SL, SouzaNeto JA,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract Malaria parasite transmission depends on the successful transition of Plasmodium through discrete developmental stages in the lumen of the mosquito midgut. Like the human intestinal tract, the mosquito midgut contains a diverse microbial flora, which may compromise the ability of Plasmodium to establish infection. We have identified an Enterobacter bacterium isolated from wild mosquito populations in Zambia that renders the mosquito resistant to infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum by interfering with parasite development before invasion of the midgut epithelium. Phenotypic analyses showed that the anti-Plasmodium mechanism requires small populations of replicating bacteria and is mediated through a mosquito-independent interaction with the malaria parasite. We show that this anti-Plasmodium effect is largely caused by bacterial generation of reactive oxygen species.
This article was published in Science and referenced in Biochemistry & Physiology: Open Access

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

  •  2nd International Conference on Biochemistry
    Sep 21-22, 2017, Macau, Hong Kong

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords