alexa Ophthalmia neonatorum in the United Arab Emirates.
Ophthalmology

Ophthalmology

Journal of Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology

Author(s): Nsanze H, Dawodu A, Usmani A, Sabarinathan K, Varady E

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Abstract Ophthalmia neonatorum in small babies is a common problem in neonatal units in Al Ain, but is infrequently associated with sexually transmitted disease agents. A study of 81 babies with ophthalmia neonatorum showed that 81.5\% had bacterial or fungal infections. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest causative organism followed by Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa while Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae were responsible for less than 5\% of all cases. The disease was predominantly mild to moderately severe and easily treated with topical broad-spectrum antibiotic agents which are effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including hospital-associated strains. The most effective antimicrobial agents were gentamicin topically or ceftriaxone systemically. PIP: Neonatal conjunctivitis is common in many developing countries, often due to a sexually transmitted disease (STD) such as Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoea. The prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum (ON) depends considerably upon knowledge of the type and incidence of the causative organisms, just as the recommended treatment protocols for ON vary according to the local causative microorganisms and their sensitivity to available antimicrobial agents. ON is a common problem in the neonatal units of Al Ain, but infrequently associated with STD agents. A study found 81.5\% of 81 babies with ON to have either bacterial or fungal infections. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common causative organism followed by Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoea were responsible for less than 5\% of all cases. The disease was mainly mild to moderately severe and easily treated with topical broad-spectrum antibiotic agents effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including hospital-associated strains. The most effective antimicrobial agents were gentamicin topically and ceftriaxone systemically.
This article was published in Ann Trop Paediatr and referenced in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology

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