alexa Ozone, trace gas, and particulate matter measurements at a rural site in southwestern New York state: 1995-2005.
Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

Author(s): Schwab JJ, Spicer JB, Demerjian KL

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Abstract A research site for atmospheric chemistry and air pollution measurements was established at Pinnacle State Park in Addison, NY, in 1995. This paper presents an overview of the site characteristics and measurement program, as well as monthly average concentrations for many of the trace gas and aerosol pollutants over the full measurement period. Monthly averaged ozone concentrations range from values as low as 15 parts per billion (ppb) during cold-season months, to values approaching 50 ppb during some spring and summer months. Sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and reactive odd nitrogen (NOy) all show distinct seasonal variation, with summertime monthly averages as low as 1-3 ppb, and wintertime monthly averages from 6-12 ppb. The variation in carbon monoxide (CO) is much smaller, with minimums of approximately 150 ppb and maximums only rarely exceeding 250 ppb. Data for three hydrocarbon species--propane, benzene, and isoprene--are presented. Propane and benzene show higher monthly averaged concentrations in the winter and lower values in the summer, with values ranging over a factor of 4-5. Isoprene, on the other hand has much higher values during the summer season, sometimes a factor of 10 or more greater than concentrations measured in the winter. Monthly averaged plots for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) beginning in 1999 show a robust summer maximum and winter minimum, and roughly a factor of two difference between the two. An empirical measure of ozone production using the correlation of hour-averaged ozone and NOy data illustrates relatively robust ozone production during some, but not all, summertime months over the time period. Also, an analysis of the frequency distribution of the hours of maximum ozone concentration shows a strong mid-afternoon peak, as expected, but also a prominent secondary maximum centered around midnight. The secondary peak is interpreted as ozone transported from ozone-producing areas to the west, including Buffalo, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, and the Ohio Valley. Finally, SO2 concentrations as a function of wind direction clearly indicate maximum impacts when the winds are out of the south (Pittsburgh and Philadelphia), with a secondary peak when the winds are from the north-northeast, consistent with the locations of major SO2 emission sources in the region.
This article was published in J Air Waste Manag Assoc and referenced in Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

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