alexa Pathogenicity of different rabies virus variants inversely correlates with apoptosis and rabies virus glycoprotein expression in infected primary neuron cultures.
Microbiology

Microbiology

Journal of Antivirals & Antiretrovirals

Author(s): Morimoto K, Hooper DC, Spitsin S, Koprowski H, Dietzschold B

Abstract Share this page

Abstract The mouse-adapted rabies virus strain CVS-24 has stable variants, CVS-B2c and CVS-N2c, which differ greatly in their pathogenicity for normal adult mice and in their ability to infect nonneuronal cells. The glycoprotein (G protein), which has previously been implicated in rabies virus pathogenicity, shows substantial structural differences between these variants. Although prior studies have identified antigenic site III of the G protein as the major pathogenicity determinant, CVS-B2c and CVS-N2c do not vary at this site. The possibility that pathogenicity is inversely related to G protein expression levels is suggested by the finding that CVS-B2c, the less pathogenic variant, expresses at least fourfold-higher levels of G protein than CVS-N2c in infected neurons. Although there is some difference between CVS-B2c- and CVS-N2c-infected neurons in G protein mRNA expression levels, the differential expression of G protein appears to be largely determined by posttranslational mechanisms that affect G protein stability. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that the G protein of CVS-B2c is degraded more slowly than that of CVS-N2c. The accumulation of G protein correlated with the induction of programmed cell death in CVS-B2c-infected neurons. The extent of apoptosis was considerably lower in CVS-N2c-infected neurons, where G protein expression was minimal. While nucleoprotein (N protein) expression levels were similar in neurons infected with either variant, the transport of N protein into neuronal processes was strongly inhibited in CVS-B2c-infected cells. Thus, downregulation of G protein expression in neuronal cells evidently contributes to rabies virus pathogenesis by preventing apoptosis and the apparently associated failure of the axonal transport of N protein.
This article was published in J Virol and referenced in Journal of Antivirals & Antiretrovirals

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords