alexa Persistent depression affects adherence to secondary prevention behaviors after acute coronary syndromes.
Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

Author(s): Kronish IM, Rieckmann N, Halm EA, Shimbo D, Vorchheimer D,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract BACKGROUND: The persistence of depressive symptoms after hospitalization is a strong risk factor for mortality after acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Poor adherence to secondary prevention behaviors may be a mediator of the relationship between depression and increased mortality. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether rates of adherence to risk reducing behaviors were affected by depressive status during hospitalization and 3 months later. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study. SETTING: Three university hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: Five hundred and sixty patients were enrolled within 7 days after ACS. Of these, 492 (88\%) patients completed 3-month follow-up. MEASUREMENTS: We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) to assess depressive symptoms in the hospital and 3 months after discharge. We assessed adherence to 5 risk-reducing behaviors by patient self-report at 3 months. We used chi2 analysis to compare differences in adherence among 3 groups: persistently nondepressed (BDI < 10 at hospitalization and 3 months); remittent depressed (BDI > or = 10 at hospitalization; < 10 at 3 months); and persistently depressed patients (BDI > or = 10 at hospitalization and 3 months). RESULTS: Compared with persistently nondepressed, persistently depressed patients reported lower rates of adherence to quitting smoking (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.23, 95\% confidence interval [95\% CI] 0.05 to 0.97), taking medications (adjusted OR 0.50, 95\% CI 0.27 to 0.95), exercising (adjusted OR 0.57, 95\% CI 0.34 to 0.95), and attending cardiac rehabilitation (adjusted OR 0.5, 95\% CI 0.27 to 0.91). There were no significant differences between remittent depressed and persistently nondepressed patients. CONCLUSIONS: Persistently depressed patients were less likely to adhere to behaviors that reduce the risk of recurrent ACS. Differences in adherence to these behaviors may explain in part why depression predicts mortality after ACS.
This article was published in J Gen Intern Med and referenced in Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri, Food, Aqua and Veterinary Science Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Clinical and Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Earth & Environmental Sciences

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science and Health care Journals

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics and Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Informatics Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Material Sciences Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Mathematics and Physics Journals

Jim Willison

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

John Behannon

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords