alexa Pharmacokinetics of acyclovir after intravenous and oral administration.
Pharmaceutical Sciences

Pharmaceutical Sciences

Journal of Bioequivalence & Bioavailability

Author(s): de Miranda P, Blum MR

Abstract Share this page

Abstract Acyclovir pharmacokinetics has been extensively investigated during the various phases of clinical development. Most of the administered drug is eliminated from the body unchanged, via the kidneys by glomerular filtration and tubular secretion. After intravenous dosing of patients with normal renal function, 8 to 14\% of the dose is recovered in the urine as the metabolite 9-carboxymethoxymethylguanine. Adequate distribution of acyclovir has been demonstrated in the cerebrospinal fluid, vesicular fluid, vaginal secretions and tissues. The low plasma protein binding of acyclovir precludes drug interactions involving binding displacement. When intravenous doses in the range of 2.5 to 15 mg/kg were given every 8 h to adult patients, dose-independent kinetics was observed. Continuous infusions of acyclovir over an equivalent daily dose range have achieved predictable plasma levels. Acyclovir half-life (T1/2 beta) and total body clearance (Cltot) are influenced significantly by renal function, and dosage adjustments should be made for patients with impaired renal function. For patients with normal renal function (creatinine clearance (Clcr) greater than 80 ml/min/1.73m2) mean T1/2 beta and Cltot were 2.5 h and 327 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively. In children 1-year-old or older, Cltot normalized by body surface area was essentially the same as in adults with normal renal function, whereas Cltot for neonates was approximately one-third the adult value. In the adult population, age-related decreases in acyclovir Cltot reflect age-related changes in renal function; therefore dosage adjustments based on Clcr will compensate for age effects on acyclovir pharmacokinetics. After oral administration, the bioavailability of acyclovir was approximately 20\%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
This article was published in J Antimicrob Chemother and referenced in Journal of Bioequivalence & Bioavailability

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords