alexa Rapid detection and prevalence of cholesteryl ester transfer protein deficiency caused by an intron 14 splicing defect in hyperalphalipoproteinemia.
Healthcare

Healthcare

Journal of Community Medicine & Health Education

Author(s): Inazu A, Koizumi J, Haraki T, Yagi K, Wakasugi T,

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Abstract A deficiency of plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is one of the genetic causes of increased serum high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels (hyperalphalipoproteinemia). A splicing defect (G-->A mutation) at the +1 position of intron 14 of the human CETP gene is a common mutation in the Japanese CETP deficiency. A rapid screening method for the splicing defect by means of primer-specified restriction map modification was described. The frequency of the mutation in hyperalphalipoproteinemia was determined, and its frequency in the general population was estimated. During polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a modified primer, a novel NdeI restriction endonuclease site was created from the mutated allele in the PCR products, which could be visualized after electrophoresis of the digested products. As a result, 21 of 121 unrelated hyperalphalipoproteinemic subjects with HDL-cholesterol > or = 60 mg/dl (1.55 mmol/l), were found to have the G-->A mutation. Of the 21 individuals, 8 were found to be homozygous for the mutation. Allele frequency of the mutation was 1.5\% (1/68), 2.8\% (2/72), 7.1\% (4/56), and 47.8\% (22/46) in the groups with HDL-cholesterol levels of 60-79 mg/dl, 80-99 mg/dl, 100-119 mg/dl, and > or = 120 mg/dl, respectively. Based on the percentage of the area under the computed normal distribution curve of serum HDL-cholesterol, the frequency of the mutated allele in the general population was estimated to be 0.81\% from the present results. This rapid detection method facilitates large-scale screening of CETP deficiency caused by the splicing defect. The mutation was frequent in Japanese subjects with hyperalphalipoproteinemia, especially in the group with HDL-cholesterol > or = 120 mg/dl.
This article was published in Hum Genet and referenced in Journal of Community Medicine & Health Education

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