alexa Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein exhibits neuroprotection in two rat models of stroke.
Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

Author(s): Patern R, Ruocco A, Postiglione A, Hubsch A, Andresen I,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract BACKGROUND: Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) is prepared from apolipoprotein A-I, isolated from human plasma, and soybean-derived phosphatidylcholine and exhibits biochemical and functional characteristics similar to endogenous nascent high-density lipoprotein (HDL). This study tested the hypothesis that pretreatment with rHDL may reduce neuronal damage in 2 experimental rat models of stroke. METHODS: In the first model, an excitotoxic lesion was induced by unilateral injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in the right striatum (excitotoxic lesion model). In the second model, temporary occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) was attained by inserting a nylon thread through the carotid artery and blood flow was restored 30 min later (MCAo model). In both models, either rHDL (120 mg/kg) or saline (control) were infused over 4 h, starting 2 h before the injection of NMDA or the induction of ischemia, respectively. 24 h after the interventions, the rats were sacrificed and the brains removed for histochemical preparation. The necrotic area was delimited using an image analysis system. In addition, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human endothelial (ECV 304) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-BE) cell lines were measured fluorometrically as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence in the presence and absence of rHDL and under basal and stress-induced conditions. RESULTS: In the excitotoxic lesion and MCAo models, pretreatment with rHDL significantly reduced the brain necrotic area by 61 and 76\%, respectively (p < 0.01). Overnight incubation of ECV 304 and SK-N-BE cells with 0.5 mg/ml rHDL decreased basal and stress-induced ROS levels by 73 and 72\% (ECV 304) and by 76 and 43\% (SK-N-BE), respectively (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that rHDL reduces neuronal damage after onset of ischemic stroke, possibly by involving an anti-oxidative mechanism. Thus, rHDL may be a powerful neuroprotective tool for the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel This article was published in Cerebrovasc Dis and referenced in Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords