alexa Relationship between gut-specific autonomic testing and bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients.
Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

Author(s): Emmanuel AV, Chung EA, Kamm MA, Middleton F

Abstract Share this page

Abstract STUDY DESIGN: Investigation of bowel function in 55 patients and 26 healthy volunteers using radiological, anorectal physiological and laser Doppler blood flow monitoring. OBJECTIVES: Bowel dysfunction is common after spinal cord injury (SCI). We aimed to determine whether hindgut testing of autonomic innervation provides insight into presence of symptoms, altered motor function (transit) and level of injury. SETTING: St Mark's Hospital, UK and The Spinal Injuries Unit, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, UK. METHODS: A total of 55 patients with chronic complete SCI and 26 healthy volunteers were studied. Twenty-four patients had lesions above T5 and 31 had lesions below T5. Thirty-five patients complained of constipation: 75\% (18/24) of patients with lesions above T5 and 55\% (17/31) of those with lesions below T5. Gut transit, rectal electrosensitivity and rectal blood flow were measured. RESULTS: Slow gut transit occurred in 65\% of patients and in all the 35 patients complaining of constipation. Delay was pancolonic. All patients had an elevated sensory threshold. The threshold was significantly higher in those with subjective constipation (P<0.01), slow transit (P<0.04) and high SCI (P=0.046). Mucosal blood flow was lower in SCI patients with constipation (P<0.04) and slow transit (P<0.03). It was higher than normal in high-SCI volunteers (P=0.056), reflecting loss of sympathetic inhibition. CONCLUSIONS: In SCI, subjective constipation correlates closely with slow gut transit. Delay is pancolonic, regardless of the site of lesion. Sensory testing provides evidence for completeness of lesion, offering further evidence for pain transmission through sympathetic pathways. Studies in SCI patients provide further evidence of mucosal blood flow as a marker of altered autonomic innervation. This article was published in Spinal Cord and referenced in Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords