alexa Renal toxicity of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
Microbiology

Microbiology

Journal of Microbial & Biochemical Technology

Author(s): Murray MD, Brater DC

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Abstract NSAIDs pose little threat of renal insult in normal, healthy persons at therapeutic dosages. However, NSAID administration to susceptible persons may cause decrements in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate within hours. Such acute noxious renal effects are mediated by products of arachidonic acid metabolism. Precipitous decrements in glomerular filtration and renal ischemia, manifested by increased serum creatinine and urea nitrogen, are possible. However, these effects are usually fully reversible with prompt discontinuation of the offending NSAID. Risk factors for the development of these acute renal effects are known. Acute interstitial nephritis with or without nephrotic syndrome is a rare form of renal toxicity that typically occurs between 2-18 months of use. Renal impairment may be so severe as to require temporary hemodialysis; however, renal function usually returns to normal upon discontinuation of the NSAID. The mechanism of acute interstitial nephritis is presumed to be of allergic origin but could also be caused by a reactive metabolite. Fenoprofen use appears to be associated with a much higher risk for its development. In contrast to the acute effects of NSAIDs, irreversible, analgesic-associated nephropathy manifested by papillary necrosis and chronic interstitial nephritis may occur following months to years of high doses of analgesic mixtures. The mechanism by which combination analgesics produce this form of renal injury is unknown and could be either a result of medullary ischemia or a direct effect of a reactive metabolite. An important issue to be resolved is the relationship between the acute, reversible, prostaglandin-mediated renal effects of the NSAIDs and chronic, irreversible destruction, if such a relationship exists. Theoretically, continual or repeated decrements in renal function in patients with predisposing risk factors could cause or contribute to progressive deterioration in renal function. Elevations in blood pressure or interference with the effects of antihypertensive medications could theoretically also contribute to long-term renal deterioration. In addition to renal syndromes caused by NSAIDs that result in renal impairment, other transient effects on electrolyte and water metabolism may also occur. Reduced secretion of sodium may result in formation of edema, exacerbation of heart failure, or increased blood pressure. Hyporeninemic-hypoaldosteronism may produce hyperkalemia. Finally, reduced excretion of water has rarely caused hyponatremia. It has been suggested that NSAIDs may be renoprotective in patients with nephrotic syndrome. Others have suggested that sulindac is "renal-sparing" because of a unique metabolic pathway that supposedly limits the exposure of the kidney to the active sulfide metabolite.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) This article was published in Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol and referenced in Journal of Microbial & Biochemical Technology

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