alexa Retinol homeostasis in lambs given low and high intakes of vitamin A.
Microbiology

Microbiology

Journal of Antivirals & Antiretrovirals

Author(s): Donoghue S, Kronfeld DS, Sklan D

Abstract Share this page

Abstract Four groups of lambs were fed on a low-carotene basal diet. One group received no supplemental vitamin A (mildly deficient). Remaining groups were supplemented daily with vitamin A acetate equivalent to 100 (control) 9000 (mildly intoxicated) and 18000 (severely intoxicated) microgram retinol/kg body-weight. After 16 weeks lambs received a bolus of [15-3H]retinol intravenously; blood, urine and faeces were sampled for 48 h. Plasma retinol was complexed to a protein of 20000 molecular weight (MW), which in turn was complexed to a protein of 65000 MW; these proteins correspond respectively to retinol-binding protein and prealbumin. Plasma retinol concentration reached plateau values in intoxicated lambs, but plasma retinyl ester concentrations increased rapidly when liver contents of both retinol and retinyl esters exceeded approximately 10 and 100 mg respectively and kidney contents of both retinol and retinyl esters exceeded 30 micrograms. Labelled compounds, more polar than retinol, were found in plasma; their concentration increased tenfold in intoxicated lambs within 48 h. Plasma retinol transport rates were 0.1, 10.5 and 11.8 times control values, and clearance rates were 0.3, 14.1 and 14.3 times control values in mildly-deficient, and mildly- or severely-intoxicated lambs respectively. Turnover of retinol increased rapidly when liver contents of retinol and retinyl esters exceeded approximately 10 and 100 mg respectively and kidney contents of both retinol and retinyl esters exceeded approximately 30 micrograms. Plasma clearance of retinyl esters was unchanged with intake. Faecal excretion of tracer increased linearly with plasma retinol clearance. Our findings identify several variables that appear to be involved in retinol homeostasis, including plasma retinol clearance and excretion.
This article was published in Br J Nutr and referenced in Journal of Antivirals & Antiretrovirals

Relevant Expert PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords