alexa Seasonal trends in epidemiological and entomological profiles of malaria transmission in North Central Nigeria.
Haematology

Haematology

Journal of Blood Disorders & Transfusion

Author(s): Olayemi IK, Ande AT, Ayanwale AV, Mohammed AZ, Bello IM,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract The influence of seasonal changes on epidemiological and entomological indices of malaria transmission in North Central Nigeria was elucidated in a series of studies carried out between January 2004 and December 2009. The climate in the study area was divided into three seasonal periods namely, rainy (May-October), dry (December-March) and transitional (April and November), during which larval and adult anopheline mosquito collections were carried out and assessed for densities, sporozoite infection and parity rates and potentials for malaria transmission. The results indicated that the climate in the study area was clearly seasonal, with close similarities in the patterns of distribution of the climatic factors in the study sites. Mosquito densities, both at the adult and larval stages (i.e., 29.35 +/- 5.10 adult mosquitoes/man/night and 10.36 +/- 3.34 larvae/dip, respectively), were significantly (p<0.05) highest during the rainy season. However, while the former varied significantly in the three seasonal periods, the latter was not significantly different during the dry and transitional seasons. Malaria transmission risks, in terms of sporozoite rates and entomological inoculation rates, was significantly (p<0.05) least in the dry season (i.e., 2.89 +/- 1.25\% and 0.37 +/- 0.21 infective bite/man/night, respectively) but the two variables were not significantly (p>0.05) different during the transitional and rainy seasons. Adult mosquito daily survival rate and adult longevity were least in the dry season (26.52 +/- 11.80\% and 6.80 days, respectively) and significantly (p<0.05) highest during the rainy season (72.28 +/- 4.00\% and 16.95 +/- 4.20 days, respectively). Parous rates of the mosquitoes and duration of sporogony had distinct distribution pattern from the other variables investigated. While, significantly highest parous rates were recorded in the transitional season (86.00 +/- 4.30\%), duration of sporogony was not significantly (p>0.05) different during the three seasons. The epidemiology of urban malaria in North Central Nigeria was discussed from the view points of the these results and concluded that the findings should promote the development of informed temporally-targeted vector control programs for the area.
This article was published in Pak J Biol Sci and referenced in Journal of Blood Disorders & Transfusion

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri, Food, Aqua and Veterinary Science Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Clinical and Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Earth & Environmental Sciences

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science and Health care Journals

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics and Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Informatics Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Material Sciences Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Mathematics and Physics Journals

Jim Willison

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

John Behannon

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords