alexa Selenium depuration: residual effects of dietary selenium on Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus).
Agri and Aquaculture

Agri and Aquaculture

Journal of Aquaculture Research & Development

Author(s): Deng DF, Hung SS, Teh SJ

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Abstract We examined the growth performance, tissue selenium (Se) concentration, and histopathology of Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus) fed a control diet (0.4 microg Se/g) for 1, 3, 7, 13, 21 wk after a 9-month dietary exposure to 0.4, 12.6, 26.0, and 57.6 microg Se/g dry diet. Splittail previously fed 57.6 microg Se/g showed a significantly (P<0.05) lower final body weight but had higher weight gain than fish fed 0.4 microg Se/g diet at the end of the 21-wk depuration study. There were no significant differences in body weight in fish previously fed diets with or less than 26.0 microg Se/g. Liver and muscle Se concentrations decreased significantly in fish previously fed 26.0 and 57.6 microg Se/g diet but did not change significantly in fish fed 12.6 or less mug Se/g diet at the end of 21 wk. Liver Se concentrations dropped to the same concentration as fish fed 0.4 microg Se/g diet after a 13-wk depuration in all treatments. Muscle Se concentrations remained significantly higher in fish previously fed 12.6 or higher microg Se/g diets when compared to fish fed control diet at the end of a 21-wk depuration. Except for the presence of preneoplastic basophilic foci in two fish previously fed 57.6 microg Se/g diet, normal liver morphology was observed in splittail in all treatments at the end of 21-wk depuration. Prevalences of kidney lesions were increased in fish previously fed 26.0 and 57.6 microg Se/g diets at 3 and 7 wk, and decreased at 13 and 21 wk of depuration. No kidney lesions were observed in fish previously fed 12.6 microg Se/g diet or less. In conclusion, growth of splittail previously fed a diet containing 57.6 microg Se/g was still affected at the end of 21-wk depuration. The 21-wk depuration was not long enough for muscle Se concentrations to return to basal levels in fish previously fed 12.6 or more microg Se/g diet. Deleterious health effects of Se persisted in fish previously fed diets with 26.0 or more microg Se/g diet. Current results suggest that splittail that survived the 9-month exposure to 12.6 or less microg Se/g diet under current laboratory conditions is likely to thrive if Se in diet was reduced to control concentration. This article was published in Sci Total Environ and referenced in Journal of Aquaculture Research & Development

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