alexa Self-hypnotic relaxation during interventional radiological procedures: effects on pain perception and intravenous drug use.
Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Journal of Psychology & Psychotherapy

Author(s): Lang EV, Joyce JS, Spiegel D, Hamilton D, Lee KK

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Abstract The authors evaluated whether self-hypnotic relaxation can reduce the need for intravenous conscious sedation during interventional radiological procedures. Sixteen patients were randomized to a test group, and 14 patients were randomized to a control group. All had patient-controlled analgesia. Test patients additionally had self-hypnotic relaxation and underwent a Hypnotic Induction Profile test. Compared to controls, test patients used less drugs (0.28 vs. 2.01 drug units; p < .01) and reported less pain (median pain rating 2 vs. 5 on a 0-10 scale; p < .01). Significantly more control patients exhibited oxygen desaturation and/or needed interruptions of their procedures for hemodynamic instability. Benefit did not correlate with hypnotizability. Self-hypnotic relaxation can reduce drug use and improve procedural safety. This article was published in Int J Clin Exp Hypn and referenced in Journal of Psychology & Psychotherapy

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