alexa Slip in the 1857 and earlier large earthquakes along the Carrizo Plain, San Andreas Fault.
Geology & Earth Science

Geology & Earth Science

Journal of Remote Sensing & GIS

Author(s): Zielke O, Arrowsmith JR, Grant Ludwig L, Akiz SO

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Abstract The moment magnitude (Mw) 7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857, with a approximately 350-kilometer-long surface rupture, was the most recent major earthquake along the south-central San Andreas Fault, California. Based on previous measurements of its surface slip distribution, rupture along the approximately 60-kilometer-long Carrizo segment was thought to control the recurrence of 1857-like earthquakes. New high-resolution topographic data show that the average slip along the Carrizo segment during the 1857 event was 5.3 +/- 1.4 meters, eliminating the core assumption for a linkage between Carrizo segment rupture and recurrence of major earthquakes along the south-central San Andreas Fault. Earthquake slip along the Carrizo segment may recur in earthquake clusters with cumulative slip of approximately 5 meters. This article was published in Science and referenced in Journal of Remote Sensing & GIS

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