alexa Small intestinal injury caused by NSAIDs aspirin: finding new from old.
Pharmaceutical Sciences

Pharmaceutical Sciences

Pharmaceutica Analytica Acta

Author(s): Arakawa T, Watanabe T, Tanigawa T, Tominaga K, Otani K,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract Small intestinal injury caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or aspirin is an epoch making topic in clinical field with the aid of new devices, capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy to look at small intestine directly. However, the injury has been reported in animals since more than 40 years ago. Proposed mechanisms are impairment of mucosal defense through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) resulting in deficiency of prostaglandins, and mitochondrial disorder. Possible aggressive factors are NSAIDs/aspirin themselves, bile, and enterobacteria. Translocation of enterobacteria through the mucosa impaired integrity may be the first step of the injury. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides stimulate toll-like receptor-4 in macrophages, which increases proinflammatory cytokines through MyD88 signaling pathway. Finally neutrophils are activated and the small intestinal mucosa is injured with the attacks of NSAIDs/aspirin themselves, bile, and proteolytic enzymes and active oxygen species released by neutrophils. Candidates of treatment tools are prostaglandin derivatives, mucoprotective drugs, probiotics, and mitochondrial protective drugs such as metronidazole and cyclosporin A. Further clinical studies are needed to elucidate the effect in humans.
This article was published in Curr Med Chem and referenced in Pharmaceutica Analytica Acta

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords