alexa The effect of eyestalk ablation on spawning, molting and mating of Penaeus semisulcatus de Haan
Agri and Aquaculture

Agri and Aquaculture

Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal

Author(s): CL Browdy, TM Samocha

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Penaeus semisulcatus spawned both spontaneously and after unilateral eyestalk ablation in a controlled experimental system. Eight ablated females, five nonablated females and five males were stocked into each of three flow-through maturation tanks (3 m3 each). Individuals were tagged and molting, ovarian development and spawning were followed. The molt cycle of ablated females was significantly shortened but spawning and egg production increased. A total of 89 spawns were collected from the ablated animals (averaging 4.64 spawns ± 2.72 per female) and 14 spawns were collected from the nonablated broodstock (averaging 1.13 spawns ± 0.99 per female). The average number of eggs produced per female was greater for ablated animals though the size of an average spawn was smaller. There was no significant difference in egg quality between spawns from ablated broodstock and those from spontaneous spawners (as measured by the hatchability and by the percent metamorphosis to zoea 1). There was a significant reduction in the mating success of ablated females. One successful mating proved sufficient to fertilize up to four spawns in one molt cycle with no significant reduction in the percent fertility. The size of an average first spawn in the molt cycle of an ablated animal was significantly larger than subsequent spawns but the percent hatch and the percent metamorphosis were not significantly different. The increased energetic demand after eyestalk ablation was reflected in the size of the average spawn and perhaps in the trend towards decreasing growth. Egg quality, however, did not suffer. These results suggest a reliable method for production of eggs from captive P. semisulcatus using eyestalk ablation with no significant reduction in survival or spawn quality over an 85-day period.

This article was published in Aquaculture and referenced in Fisheries and Aquaculture Journal

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