alexa The effect of inotropes on morbidity and mortality in preterm infants with low systemic or organ blood flow.
Pediatrics

Pediatrics

Journal of Neonatal Biology

Author(s): Osborn DA, Paradisis M, Evans N

Abstract Share this page

Abstract BACKGROUND: Low systemic blood flow (SBF) is common in extremely premature infants in the first day after birth and has been associated with peri / intraventricular haemorrhage (PIVH), necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), mortality and developmental impairment. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of specific inotropes on morbidity and mortality in preterm infants with low systemic blood flow SEARCH STRATEGY: Searches were made of The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2006 ), MEDLINE (1966 - April 2006), EMBASE (1980 - April 2006) and CINAHL (1982 - April 2006), supplemented by searches of abstracts of conference proceedings, citations of reviews and expert informants. SELECTION CRITERIA: Random and quasi-random controlled trials of inotropes enrolling preterm infants with low systemic or organ blood flow in the neonatal period. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Independent assessment of trial eligibility, quality and data extraction by each review author. Synthesis of data using relative risk (RR) and weighted mean difference (WMD) using standard methods of the Cochrane Collaboration. MAIN RESULTS: No studies that compared an inotrope to no treatment in preterm infants with low SBF were found. One study (Osborn 2002a) was found that compared dobutamine versus dopamine. The study was of adequate methodology. It enrolled 42 infants < 30 weeks gestation and < 12 hours after birth with low SVC flow. The trial compared the effect of dobutamine versus dopamine titrated 10 to 20 mug/kg/min with the goal of increasing and maintaining SVC flow > 40 ml/kg/min. No significant difference was reported in mortality to discharge (RR 1.41, 95\% CI 0.79, 2.52), PIVH (RR 1.01, 95\% 0.52, 1.97), grade 3 or 4 PIVH (RR 0.39, 95\% CI 0.12, 1.31) or NEC. At three years, there was no significant difference in cerebral palsy, deafness, Developmental quotient > 2 sd below norm or combined disability (RR 0.10, 95\% CI 0.01, 1.56). Surviving infants treated with dobutamine had a significantly higher development quotient (MD 35.00, 95\% CI 17.68, 52.32). There was no significant difference in death or disability at the latest time reported (RR 0.95, 95\% CI 0.66, 1.38). For secondary outcomes, there was no significant difference in periventricular leucomalacia, renal impairment, pulmonary haemorrhage, retinopathy of prematurity or CLD at 36 weeks. There was no significant difference in treatment failure. Dobutamine produced a significantly greater increase in SVC flow at the highest dose reached (MD 13.10, 95\% CI 2.87, 23.33), whereas dopamine produced a significantly greater increase in mean BP at 10 and 20 mug/kg/min and at the highest dose reached (MD -7.20, 95\% CI -11.41, -2.99). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: In preterm infants with low systemic blood flow, there is some evidence that dobutamine is better than dopamine at increasing and maintaining systemic blood flow. The only eligible trial did not demonstrate any consistent differences in clinical outcomes. However, this study was not sufficiently powered to prove or disprove effects on clinical outcomes. It is unclear what is the most effective strategy for improving the cardiovascular status of immature infants in the first day. Further trials are needed to determine effective strategies for preventing and improving low systemic and organ blood flow. This article was published in Cochrane Database Syst Rev and referenced in Journal of Neonatal Biology

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

  • 20th International Conference on Neonatology and Perinatology
    December 04-06, 2017 Madrid, Spain

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri, Food, Aqua and Veterinary Science Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Clinical and Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Earth & Environmental Sciences

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science and Health care Journals

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics and Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Informatics Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Material Sciences Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Mathematics and Physics Journals

Jim Willison

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

John Behannon

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords